Fund Your Favorite

Team SBD

Total Progress

% to complete

  • 26
  • 450
  • 45700
  • 20
  • 538
  • 64
  • 220
  • 535
  • 160
  • 50
  • 150
  • 75
  • 500
  • 200
  • 356
  • 6
  • 1000

Raised

$

Goal

$50000

Remaining

 days

Team F-117

Total Progress

% to complete

  • 375
  • 20300
  • 100
  • 1255
  • 485
  • 250
  • 367
  • 60
  • 7
  • 525
  • 100
  • 20
  • 5
  • 2017

Raised

$

Goal

$50000

Remaining

 days

We have a challenge winner!

Team SBD has "flown" over the finish line, thanks to dozens of generous individual donors and a hefty gift from the National Aviation Museum Foundation! The team is working hard to get the work done and to have the SBD-2P ready for its travels to Pearl Harbor in time for a dedication on the 80th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack, December 7th.   

Please support Team F-117 as they work tirelessly to complete Shaba and get her on our Flight Innovation Center Exhibit Floor. 

Meet the contenders!

Here are a few exciting fhighlights about these magnificent aircraft, and their Restoration Teams.

 

Team F-117

Team Leader: Gordon Van Dalen
 

Fast facts on the F-117 Nighthawk Shaba (817)

Designed as a stealth bomber by Lockheed Martin Nighthawks flew 1,271 sorties with an 80% success rate.

Shaba (tail number 817) first flew on January 8, 1986 and has just over 5,038 flight hours.

The highly decorated Shaba is one of 10 F-117s to fly at least 50 combat sorties and one of seven to fly in at least three of the four significant campaigns employing Nighthawks.

Shaba landed at the Air Zoo’s Restoration Center in December 2020 and will remain in Kalamazoo on permanent display upon completion. 

Learn more!


 

Team SBD

Team Leader: Terri Mucciante
 

Fast facts on the SBD-2P (Bu. No. 2173)

This aircraft was delivered to the Navy as a photo reconnaissance aircraft – one of just 14 designed for this mission.

Bu. No. 2173 was erroneously designated lost at sea in 1942 but went on to fly in the Battle of the Coral Sea.

The aircraft actually crashed into Lake Michigan on February 18, 1944 – presumably due to carburetor icing. The pilot, John Lendo, was not injured in the crash.

On June 6, 2009 Bu. No. 2173 was retrieved from Lake Michigan on behalf of the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum where it will go for long-term display upon completion.

Learn more!


 

Stay connected!

You can stay up to date with the progress our nationally recognized Restoration Team is making by joining our Facebook Group today!

Read Full Press Release 

 

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